This story originally appeared in the New York Daily News, and was written by Dan Rivoli.


Boosters of bringing F express service back to Brooklyn rallied Monday at the end of the line, in Coney Island, to show support for a speedier trip to the city.

South Brooklyn wants faster F train service, and the nabe wants it now.

Boosters of bringing F express service back to Brooklyn rallied Monday at the end of the line, in Coney Island, to show support for a speedier trip to the city.

A 2016 MTA study found that F express riders could shave more than three minutes off commute times on average, though commuters would have to ride more crowded trains than usual.

More F riders on six proposed local stops would spend more time commuting, losing 50% of peak service, according to the MTA.

The MTA discontinued F express service in 1987.“Bringing back the F Express will significantly shorten commutes and cut travel time for people currently living in transit deserts,” said Councilman David Greenfield (D-Brooklyn). “We were promised the F express after studies, repairs and improvements on other lines. Now it’s time for the MTA to keep its promise to us. Our communities deserve fast and reliable transportation, too.”Alliance for Coney Island, a neighborhood group, backed the return of F express service, creating a site called FasterCommute.NYC to build support for the transit proposal.The plan, however, is controversial further up the line in neighborhoods like Park Slope, whose commuters would see a cut in service.

Councilman Brad Lander (D) has been battling his fellow Brooklyn pols to keep F train service the way it is. He wants a plan to increase service on the F line that benefits all of its commuters.

“It adds no service to the line — instead, it simply pits Brooklyn residents against each other,” Lander said. “What we actually need is a new plan that will improve service on the F line for all riders, at local and express stops that are thoroughly vetted by the community. We don’t need F service that’s even less dependable than it is now.”

An MTA spokeswoman did not have immediate comment.